Chicken Coup – May 2015

One of the biggest challenges for ministries is becoming self-sustaining through resources that would provide food and proper nourishment. Farming is a large part of the solution and so is building a chicken coup for meat and eggs. With a huge fundraising boost from the Green Primary School in Green Ohio, the students of GPS raised over $3,800 to build a chicken coup and buy egg laying hens for the Home. The increase of protein consumption will provide the orphans with vitamins and nutrients that will keep them healthy and growing well.

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  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup
  • Chicken Coup

Bore Hole Water Well – November 2013

In November 2013 the next phase of self-sustainability was achieved when House of Hope dug a bore hole to obtain fresh water. The well was created by digging a bore hole that tapped in to a freshwater spring that fills a large Polytank on top of a tall concrete column. The home is now equipped with clean, pure water that supplies the housemothers with all the cooking and cleaning needs they have. The risky and dangerous task of getting the large, heavy Polytank on top of the tower was a challenge, but fortunately it was achieved without any injuries! Thanks to the Duvall family for a generous donation in making this project a success.

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  • Bore Hole
  • Bore Hole
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  • Bore Hole

New Dormitory Building – 2011 & 2012

2011 and 2012 were big years for the House of Hope! In May of 2011 construction began on a large two-story dormitory that would more than double the capacity of the current accommodations for the orphans of the ministry. The massive project was completed two years later in the spring of 2013. The ground floor of the new structure will contain two large dormitories, three flushing toilets and three shower stalls, one housemother room, a large dining hall, a computer/library room, and a small kitchen room. The upper floor will also contain identical lavatories as the lower level, another housemother room, and three large dormitories for future accommodations for mission teams or additional orphans as they are rescued. The right end of the second story displays the beauty of Ghana with a covered porch area overlooking the rolling hills and mountains of the villages. The beautiful structure is one of the best in the Hohoe region and regularly receives accolades from the Ghanaian Social Services for its practicality and size. A special thanks to the partners that joined our vision with generous donations to build this addition to this ministry: The Smart Family Foundation, Maranatha Bible Church, The Church of the Lakes, the Moore family, the Coy family, the Bryant family, and many more.

YouTube link for 5 minute video showing construction - https://youtu.be/JQ-WcFZLioI

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  • New Dorm
  • New Dorm
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  • New Dorm

Toilet Facility – 2010

Before
The toilet facility at the House of Hope orphanage was originally a large pit dug into the ground, lined with cement blocks to create a leach bed for the waste. The floor was a large piece of thick plywood with holes cut into it with boxes built onto it for the toilet seats. Short concrete walls were built around the wood flooring to stabilize the wooden slats which served as the walls, and tin sheeting was attached to the walls to serve as a roof. The constant barrage of rain water, plus erosion, as well as termite damage, eventually caused the structure to cave in and it was destroyed.

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  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before
  • Toilet Project Before

After
The new structure is an eight stall concrete building complete with large underground septic tanks, leach beds and exhaust vents. Each of the two sides has four stalls as well as a small porcelain sink for washing hands after using the facility. The construction was managed by an onsite supervisor who purchased the supplies, hired workers from the local village, and completed the project in a few short months. What was once an unsanitary, make-shift toilet facility has now been replaced with a large, clean, efficient one-of-a-kind structure in the village.

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  • Toilet Project After
  • Toilet Project After
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  • Toilet Project After
  • Toilet Project After
  • Toilet Project After
  • Toilet Project After

Water Line – 2009

Before
Water is one of the most important life needs. Included in the initial stages of the construction of the orphanage, a large, underground water cistern was built to capture all the rain water that collects off of the orphanage roof. By passing down the gutters in the rear of the building, through a pipe and into the cistern, the rainwater would be held in the reservoir for the drinking, bathing, and washing needs. The hand-dug well was not clean, and the underground water level in the area was insufficient for the needs of the Home. The water in the cistern was purified with chlorine tablets and other chemicals which were dropped into the reservoir. However, during the dry seasons of the year, when rainfall was scarce, the water would be quickly used up and purchasing water became very expensive.

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  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before
  • Water line Project Before

After
During the summer of 2009, a waterline was brought to the Home to provide fresh, clean water from the village’s main water supply. The project entailed digging an underground water line for three quarters of a mile to tie in to the main line in the village. By attaching a spigot to the pipe near the kitchen, the housemothers just need to turn the faucet on and all the Home’s water needs are met.

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  • Water line Project After
  • Water line Project After
  • Water line Project After
  • Water line Project After

Security Wall – 2007 to 2009

During the span of two years, masons at the orphanage were working to enclose the two acres that surrounded the Home. The location of the orphanage is in the bush area with many dangers present. During the rainy seasons, when the grasses are tall, many poisonous snakes and scorpions roam the bush. In order to keep the children safe inside the complex, the wall had to be constructed to keep the dangers out and the children in. The 6-7 foot high wall sufficiently protects the Home from unwanted intruders. A large iron gate was positioned at the front of the home to enable the complex to be locked and secure during the night. Concrete blocks, made by hand, were delivered and laid course by course until the wall was completed.

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  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project
  • Security Wall Project

Orphanage Building – 2004 to 2006

The orphanage is a large 6 room structure with two housemother quarters on either end of the building. There is a boy’s and girl’s dormitory, a dining hall, and an activity room. Detached off of the veranda is a store room for supplies and an office room. A detached kitchen is off the right side where the housemothers prepare the meals. The large toilet facility is near the front wall of the complex, surrounded by a large portion of farmland. To the right of the orphanage is a large underground reservoir where the rainwater from the roof of the building is collected. The land surrounding the building is used for farming corn, kasava, yams, beans, garden tomatoes, and mango trees. Masons and carpenters worked tediously for 2 years to complete the orphanage so that the children could have a home they could call their own.

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  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project
  • Building Project

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